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Amaranth

Summary:
No one told me that mythological creatures existed. No one told me that they would be such a major part of my life. If I could go back, would I choose to never have met any of them?


Notes:
it all belongs to stephenie meyer.


3. Chapter 3

Rating 5/5   Word Count 3293   Review this Chapter

Chapter Three

When I got home from the hospital, I ran up into my room, despite the screaming protests of my parents. They were some of the last people who I wanted to speak to for a long long long time. I slammed my door shut and paused only long enough to lock it. The lock lasted long enough to enable me to barricade myself in. Then, because I could still hear my parents- their fists banging on my door and their yells and screams and threats, I turned my music up as loud as I could and blared Maroon 5, the band that they referred to as crap, and hid in my closet.

My hands clamped over my ears, trying to stop all sound from entering my brain. I did not want to hear anything. Or say anything. Or do anything. I just wanted to be left alone. That was all that I wanted. Nobody seemed to care. I sobbed silently. If my parents heard, they would have freaked out. They already had probably had drugs prescribed for me. I had lost it- really lost it at the hospital.

The same little old lady had come in, wanting to do another kit. Once more, my word was not good enough for her. I did not want to be probed again, I started sobbing at the thought. In defense, I jumped up from the bed and started throwing whatever I could get my hands on. I even threw the Bible to make her leave. It did- but only because she fetched two uniformed guards. They held me down while she performed the heinous test again. And it came back negative just as I said it would.

The doctors and police tried to get me to take these pills. They were unusually vague about them, especially when I asked specifically what they were for. My parents told me to “do as the good doctor says”. With tears in my eyes, I forced the pills down. I woke up the next day.

The police wanted to question me. I was so used to it, I could reel off every question that I had ever been asked- first from Suky’s disappearance then now. I sobbed through it all, getting just plain tired of crying. When they asked me about the queer mark on my neck- it almost resembled a moon, I replied that it had been there for almost two weeks now. I saw it first after Carson made his first appearance. It was their fault if they didn’t see it first.

After what felt like hours and since the c.d. had long stopped, I came out. My parents, I thought, were gone. They were at least being silent, which was the thing that I craved the most. I left the blockade in place though, just incase they were being abnormally sneaky.

Something scratched at my window. I whipped around, and screamed. There stood Carson. But it was not his levitating form that scared me. It was his suddenly demonic red eyes. Eyes like the color of ruby red human blood. They bored straight into my heart. That was the first time that I realized that Carson was, in fact, truly trying to kill me.

“Remembrance?” My daddy screamed through my door.

“Daddy!” I shrieked as Carson broke my window open. Just as suddenly as he had appeared, gun shots rang out through the air, deafening me. I saw rather than heard Carson growl before turning and disappearing out the window.

I collapsed on the floor and did not move until my dad and Brad, who had bringing Gabby home from her friend’s when he saw Carson, broke through my barricade. They tried to get me to go back to the hospital, despite the fact that Carson had only stepped a foot in my room. I flat out refused and eventually persuaded them that I was right. Obviously.

Unfortunately, because this was Carson’s third attempt to kill me, twice in the same amount of days, Brad could only think of one way to protect me.




My mother- I only saw her as Katherine now, kissed both of my cheeks and tightly hugged me. Jared slapped my back and said he loved me.

“You be safe no, you hear?” Katherine said.

“Yes’m,” I stiffly hugged her back.

“Call us when you get there,” she continued.

They made it sound like I was going on vacation with a friend.

“I will,” I promised.

“Miss Remembrance,” Jerry, another of Brad’s coworkers and my escort, called to me, “It is time to go,”

I nodded my head, ready to leave. “Love you, Mem.” Gabby hugged me one last time.

I hugged her back extra-tight, not trusting myself to speak. Gabby was the only one I would miss. If I ever saw her again, I wondered how she would adjust to the life of a spoiled only child.

My bags had already been checked. I carried my carry-on and my pillow. Jerry, a short and pudgy man man who looked like he still lived with his momma in her basement, snorted. I had no confidence in him for protection. He kept going on about his responsibilities to the department - which was paying for his fare to and from Cleveland- and how it was such an inconvenience for him to be coming. Though not an inconvenience for me, he was bothersome.

I was utterly bored.

A phone at an empty terminal desk rang. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring. Ring Ring. Ring.

After that many rings, everyone was ready to kill the phone and whoever was calling. Consistently, it just rang. For twenty minutes. Annoyed, angry and with a hormonal bitchiness, I stood up, abruptly, jostling the fat of the man beside me. I stormed over to the desk and pulled the phone off the hook. Even the annoying dial tone was preferable to the constant ringing.

And that is when I saw him. Carson, his demon red e yes hidden behind sun glasses, reading the newspaper. From where he sat, his eyes could sit perfectly on Jerry and me. Worse, I could not see him.

Terrified, I stonily walked over to Jerry.

“I want a soda,” was the first thing that popped into my head.

Jerry grunted. “Go get one,”

I tried to convey the urgency in my eyes. Jerry, as dense and dull as ever, was not responding. “Aren’t you coming? You are supposed to be my escort,” I tried on last time.

“You can walk the forty feet by yourself,” Jerry snapped.

He was not helping at all.

“’Kay,” I whispered.

“Get me a diet,” he yelled as I slowly trudged off, trying not to be suspicious. Yeah right, I thought. As soon as I rounded the corner, I bolted into a run. I flew down the hallway, dodging people right and left, clutching my carry-on for dear life. I did not know hat to do or where to go, but I feared that Carson would follow me. His appearance at the terminal proved that. I suddenly understood his determination to follow me wherever I went. Though terrifying to me, it also increased my will to escape a hundred fold.

I turned left and ran as fast as I could. I saw a plane boarding. Actually, it has just finished boarding. “Wait!” I yelled breathlessly at the stewardess.

She looked at me and mistook me for a late passenger. She took my ticket without a word or smile, not even glancing at the destination. “You just made it,” she said.

I gave her a tight smile and boarded, not glancing back, completely aware of the risk I was taking. It was a very small flight. Being the last one, I picked an empty seat- luckily a window one in first class. I was tense the entire time, waiting for someone to shout, “Hey, she’s not supposed to be here!” or worse, for Carson to suddenly materialize beside me.

With each passing second, the chances seemed to jump astronomically. I sat tensely, my palms sweating. Yet the flight attendant spoke calmly and ten minutes later, we where in the air. Only then did my erratic heartbeat slow and my breathing return to normal.

For six hours, I leaned my forehead against the window. The four stewardesses offered me drinks and and a sandwich. I turned the all down, wary that somehow, the food count might up one short and I would be discovered.

My safety plane landed at seven p.m. Pacific Standard Time, on a Sunday night in Seattle. Stonily, I got up and with my single bag, I left the airport.

I briefly remembered the murder spree in Seattle from the beginning of the summer. It had gotten bad enough to make national news. I suddenly felt just as unsafe as I did with Carson back in Alabama. I quickly flagged down a taxi.

“I have a hundred dollars,” I gasped out, “Take me as far away as possible.”

The driver’s eyebrows shot up but he did not say anything. He did drive me as far away as possible. A hundred dollars took me to a tiny shore town called Port Angeles. The cabby tried to ge me to talk to him, but after a few grunts, he stopped speaking. It was 8:30 and the sun was setting. The cabby dropped me off at the corner of Vine Street and Dawson.

I thanked him and paid him. I watched him drive off before I did anything else. I had no idea what to do. Almost numb, I walked in a daze, not seeing where I was going. I did not care as I passed one street after another, the people of the city becoming nothing more than faceless bricks, building the society. They were there, but had no definition or individuality.

I was vaguely aware of the shady looks I received. I cared even less about them. My thoughts instead where on my family. I wondered if they were aware of my disappearance. Were the worried? It was cold, heartless, and incorrect of me to assume that they did not, but I did, mostly because it made it easier for me to be away from them.

The wind picked up as the night grew on. I began to grow cold. Goosebumps rose up on my arms as my stomach grumbled loudly. I was exhausted. Flat out exhausted. With no where else to go, I collapsed on the beach. With a gaze of nothingness, I stared out across the the vast obsidian ocean. The sea mist sprayed my face, gently misting me just enough to keep me awake. I don’t know how long I sat there, but it was long enough for the moon to climb high overhead.

Soft footsteps on crunching sand was the only thing that alerted me to his presence; in every other way he was silence.

“Hello,” I whispered faintly.

“Hello,” he replied just as softly, “Are you all right?”

“Yes,” I did not look at him. I did not care. Maybe if he thought I was distant, he would just leave me be.

“You need to go home,” he softly informed me.

“Why?” I sighed and looked at him. Then, I forgot everything, including my name. I could only focus on two golden eyes beautifully staring down at me.

“Because, there are some very monstrous people walking down beach and it is best for everyone if you leave now,”

Physically and mentally exhausted, I shut my eyes. “You are from the south,” I stated, not asked.

Though I could not see him, I knew that that had taken him by surprise, “Uhh…”

“Me, too,” I muttered.

“You don’t have family around here?” His voice was sharp and crisp.

“Nope,” I pronounced the ‘p’ heavily, popping it.

The boy beside me let out a deep breath. “I can’t believe I’m doing this,” he growled, almost to himself, thinking I could not hear him. The boy scooped me up quickly in his arms. I was just so exhausted, I didn’t care. Really. He could’ve killed me and I would not have lifted a finger to stop him. Very fortunate for me, this boy had different intentions. He placed me in a very comfy black car.

He put the car in drive and we sped off. The car was silent; I couldn’t hear the outside world at all.

“Are you hungry?”

My loudly rumbling stomach answered for me.

“What would you like to eat?”

“A crispy snack wrap from McDonald’s with no dressing and a large sweet tea with no ice, please,” I promptly responded.

He dryly chuckled. “My my, aren’t you very precise,”

“Yes,”

Sadly, in the north, McDonalds, as well as every other restaurant, did not carry sweet tea. I nearly cried when I found out.

“A diet coke, instead, please,” I said, fishing a five, the last of my money, out of my pocket.

“No no, is it my treat, Miss… ehh…”

“Tam,” I replied, my head resting against the icy window. “Remembrance Tam,”

“It is my pleasure, Miss Remembrance,” the boy smiled warmly at me. “I am Jasper Hale.”

“Where are you from?” I asked.

“Lafayette County, Texas,”

“Alabama,”

“So you are my fellow southerner then. I know, you already told me that,” he quickly added with a cheesy grin. “Miss Remembrance, how very fortunate that we crossed paths.”

I grinned feebly at Jasper. “Yes, perhaps so. Why are you now in Washington?”

Jasper chuckled. “You are truly from the south, as nosy as all get out. I was adopted and the family moved.”

“Oh,” I yawned. Jasper reached out and caressed my neck. It was so suddenly.

“You should go to sleep,”

Jasper did not need to tell me twice.

Two hours of speeding incessantly along the back highways of Canada, then Alaska. Jasper had thus far been able to resist the lure of her blood. But, he was not sure how much longer he could hold out. Every one would be furious that he had brought her into their den.

He could not help it. Originally, he was going top ut her in a hotel and leave her money- then he saw her neck. And now he could not leave her alone. Not now. Whoever had taken the time and care to do that to her would stop at nothing until he got her. Jasper had a good idea who it was- but he needed to run the idea by Carlisle first. If he was right- and he prayed he wasn’t, this poor girl did not have long to live, and what little life she had left would be torture. Some vampires just gave the entire race a bad name.

She would be safest with his family.

After two and a half hours, he pulled into the extensive driveway, not surprised to see Tanya’s family had been summoned as well. ‘Good’, he thought. Only Carlisle, Carmen and Eleazar would understand the significance of the name. No one in his family would grasp the markings.

“Jasper! What the hell?” Edward came roaring out of the house. Alice stood in the doorway, supported by Bella, both in agony. Realization swept over him as he understood that they thought he had killed Miss Remembrance. Even Jasper was repulsed entirely by the thought.

Stoically, Japer got out of his car and picked up a sleeping Remembrance. Both covens watched in amazement as he brushed past them all. He walked up the stairs and oh so gently placed her in the bed he shared with Alice. AFter that, he returned downstairs to answer their questions.