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Catch the Wind

Summary:
Axelle is seventeen, but her parents still haven't told her their secret. When a new kid shows up at school, Axelle can't help but find him interesting. When all the pieces of the puzzle fall into place, Axelle has some big choices to make. Part three to the Twist of Fate series!


Notes:
Like I have said many times before, I am totally addicted to this story. This story is entirely in Axelle's POV, for those of you that didn't know. I have this one planned out almost all the way... and let me tell ya, there are some HUGE twists :D But that's just how it works with me :)


15. Crazy Talk

Rating 5/5   Word Count 1672   Review this Chapter

“I'll bet I can make it to Port Angeles and back before you,” said Emmett the night before my birthday. Jack and I were eating a late dinner at the big house. We could tell that Emmett was bored. He spent the whole time after school pestering Jack and me. He was quieted for awhile when Jack agreed to race him to the store, to Seattle, and to Olympia, but after those two hours, Emmett was bored out of his mind.

“Same prize, winner takes all?” asked Jack. The prize was a night with me, of course. Jack had won me twice, Emmett had won once.

Emmett nodded. “Axelle's coming with me.”

Jack opened his mouth to protest, but Esme called from the living room, “Axelle's still grounded, remember?”

I sighed. I thought my family would have been proud of me after I slugged Aubrie. They made no secret of their distaste for her. The only person who wasn't angry at me was Emmett. My mom told me that I should have handled it with words. My dad told me that ladies didn't hit other ladies.

Emmett sighed along with me. “Alright, I guess we go solo. Ready, set-”

“Wait!” interrupted Jack. “I need a goodbye kiss.”

“I don't know if I'm quite ready for that,” said Emmett, putting his hand over his heart. “But if you insist!” He leaned forward, trying desperately to keep a straight face.

Jack ignored him and moved to my side of the table. “Bye,” he said. He gave me a quick goodbye kiss, then quickly ran from the room.

“Eww,” muttered Emmett before fleeing from the dining room. I sighed, crossed my arms, and settled in to wait for them. At least I had my dinner to keep me company. I knew they wouldn't be long.

After less than fifteen minutes, Emmett strolled into the room. “Hey, Axy,” he said, grinning.

“How'd you cheat?” I asked.

He grabbed my hand and spun me around. “Oh, I didn't cheat. I just took the car. I told him it was a race. It was his choice to run all the way there.”

“No way! Rematch!” shouted Jack, storming into the dining room.

“Rematch my ass!” laughed Emmett. “I said I could make it there before you. I did, I win, you lose,” said Emmett, still twirling me around.

Jack sighed. “Fine, but she gets to stay with me tomorrow.” He crossed his arms and cocked an eyebrow, the signature Jack look. I'm surprised my knees didn't give out. He was so, so attractive when he was arguing.

“But it's her birthday!” exclaimed Emmett.

“And?” asked Jack.

“Fine, take her. You selfish dog,” muttered Emmett.

“And proud of it,” laughed Jack. Jack took me from Emmett and wrapped his arms around my waist. He put his lips at my ear. “I'll miss you,” he whispered, kissing right below my ear. I shivered.

“You too,” I whispered.

He left soon after that, taking his own sweet time. He loved to push Emmett's buttons, and he was quite good at it. Mere seconds after he left, Emmett was plotting my escape.

“Axy, wanna go on a picnic?” asked Emmett, whispering the words into my ear quietly enough so the rest of the family wouldn't hear. I couldn't say no. Ever since I was a little girl, Emmett took me on picnics. Only, we wouldn't go to the park, we'd go way out into the middle of the forest. He told me ghost stories that still frighten me when I think of them. It had been years since I'd been on one, and I was so excited that he remembered.

“I don't have my teddy bears!” I cried, covering my mouth with my hand. The only other people that were invited to our little picnics were my stuffed animals, and I hadn't seen them since I turned seven. I remembered thinking that stuffed animals were for squares the second I blew out my candles.

“We still have them in the attic,” said Emmett, totally serious.

“I'm just kidding,” I laughed. “But how am I supposed to escape?” I asked, hushing my voice.

“Axelle, I didn't know you were so tired,” said Emmett, raising his voice slightly above his normal volume. He winked at me.

I yawned theatrically. “I'm beat!” I sighed.

“I guess it's time for you to go to bed,” he said, frowning dramatically.

“Yep,” I replied.

I didn't get to say anything else. Emmett scooped me into his arms and tore out the back door as fast as he possibly could. I buried my face in his shoulder to stifle a laugh. I had to be quiet as long as I could. There was an off chance Esme, Carlisle, and Rosalie hadn't noticed we'd left the house yet, and they might hear me if I laugh.

After a few minutes of running, Emmett slowed down. We were in a large, round meadow. There were wildflowers all around the perimeter of the clearing. It was a place that Emmett and I had gone ever since I could remember. He sat me on the ground, and I saw he had a blue blanket and a bag in his hand. He spread the blue blanket on the ground and took a seat.

It was dark outside, but the moon shone through the clouds just enough to lighten the night ever so slightly. It was cold, but I would deal with it. The wind blew in lazy gusts, tickling my face. I hadn't been on a picnic with Emmett since I was a little girl, and I was going to enjoy the occasion.

I glanced at the bag he had in his hand. “I just ate,” I said.

“I just brought you a few sodas,” he explained. He was looking at me closely. He looked confused, sad even. I didn't understand.

What?” I asked. He had been doing that a lot lately, and it was beginning to wear on me. There was something he wasn't telling me, and it wasn't doing any good for my mind. It made me feel like there was forever something stuck to my face, and I hated it.

“You're going to be an adult tomorrow,” he said. His voice sounded strained, like he was trying to hold something back.

“Yes,” I said skeptically.

He sighed and looked away, into the trees. “Axelle... you're going to be an adult. You were five when you became my best friend, and it's hard to see you grow up. I love you, you know that, and I just... I just can't comprehend the fact that you are going to be a grown-up. It was bad enough when you got boobs!” he exclaimed.

I grinned, remembering the day he realized I wasn't in a training bra anymore. He was so incredibly creeped out, he convinced me that I needed to get them chopped off right away. I spent the whole day telling my mom that I had to get the strange growths on my chest removed.

“And then, you go off and fall in love.” He quieted himself. “I'm going to miss you,” he whispered. His voice cracked. “And... and you do know to... to,” he said, tripping over his words.

“To what?” I asked cocking an eyebrow.

“Well you're in love now, and all that jazz, and I know that things can get pretty... pretty intense when you're with Jack,” said Emmett.

“Wait, wait, wait. Are you trying to give me a sex talk?” I asked, hiding a smile.

He frowned. “I just don't need a pregnant Axelle, okay? Just promise me you'll be safe. I don't care if you have it.” He shuddered. “Dammit, bad mental image. Just please, don't be stupid with you're... personal life,” he pleaded.

“Relax! I'm still one hundred percent virgin,” I said, laughing.

“Oh, thank God,” sighed Emmett. “I didn't know at first. I mean, you do stay over at his house quite a bit.”

“Hey, Unc,” I said, crawling across the small space between us. I sat myself in his lap and leaned my head against his shoulder. His arms wrapped around me. “I'm always going to be that little five-year-old, okay? Even when I'm eighty, I'll still come on picnics with you. If you want, we can even take my teddy bears,” I whispered.

“If you go down in the woods today, you're sure of a big surprise,” said Emmett.

I couldn't help but say the next line. “If you go down in the woods today, you better go in disguise,” I said. I wasn't quite singing, but I was certainly getting there.

“For every bear that ever there was will gather there for certain because,” sang Emmett, growing louder by the word.

“Today's the day the teddy bears have their picnic!” sang the both of us as loud as we could. We actually echoed.

I burst out laughing, thinking what a strange sight we were. Two grown people, singing a song about teddy bears, in the pitch black, absurdly quiet night. Soon, Emmett joined in, and not much later, the both of us were clutching our sides.

I put my head back against his shoulder after the both of us quieted down.

“We are two of the heppest cats on the planet,” sighed Emmett, taking the blanket from beneath us and wrapping it around me.

“Oh yeah, we're the bee's knees,” I agreed, sighing.

“I wonder if bees really have knees,” mused Emmett.

“And I wonder if cats really have pajamas,” I replied.

“That's just crazy talk,” said Emmett. “Everyone knows that cats don't have pajamas.”

I laughed softly and closed my eyes. “You're silly.”

I fell asleep to Emmett quietly humming teddy bears' picnic, and couldn't help but be blissfully happy that he was a part of my life. Nobody had a better best friend than I did. I didn't care what stupid, lunch box face Aubrie said, having your uncle as your best friend was the epitome of cool.