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The Falling

Summary:
In the action itself, she is weightless and free. The flight is not to be feared, only the impact. A story on the life of Esme Cullen. Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Banner By incredible Iris!


Notes:
I may submit this to the official site. What do you think?


36. Chapter 36

Rating 5/5   Word Count 568   Review this Chapter

But as soon as you do,

“What happened, Esme?” Mother demands.

“Mother, I want to go out West.”

She ignores me utterly. “Yes, yes. What did Charles do?”

I groan. “He asked me to marry him.”

“Shall I set a date, or have you two already… where’s the ring… I… where are you going to live? Are you planning to have children already or… where will the ceremony be? How many people…”

“I said no.”

“What? Esme, you’re throwing away your life!”

No, I’m doing the exact opposite. You think I can have a life married to someone I don’t love. “Mother, I said it already. I want to go out West, to the wild open world, and be a schoolteacher- a nice, respectable profession! I can nurture young minds, set good examples, find why I… I can find out who I am. I can live a good life, a strong life. I’ll never be a burden to the family, and I…”

“Absolutely not.”

“What?”

“Esme, it’s unacceptable! A young lady, living by herself, out in the wilderness where any man could come along and take advantage of her… positively scandalous! I’m sure your father would agree.”

I’m sure my father doesn’t care. “Mother, I don’t wish to marry Charles Evenson.” I state it as unequivocally as possible.

“William, dear?”

My father rushes in the instant he’s summoned. I try not to roll my eyes. He is like a trained lapdog. “Marian, whatever is the problem?”

“Your daughter wants to go live out West, in the wilderness, teaching, instead of marrying that lovely boy you like so much.”

“Which?”

“Charles Evenson, dear.”

My father nods. I’m sure he has no real opinion, but even a greater fool than he couldn’t misinterpret the cue Mother was giving him. “You should marry him,” he says.

This time, I can’t restrain the scornful gesture. Honestly, it’s the most obvious episode of manipulation I’ve ever seen in my life. Mother compounds it by saying, “Yes, you should. Your father’s right.”

I sigh. “Mother, can’t I do what I want?”

She looks at me in total bewilderment, like it’s the most ludicrous thing she’s ever heard. “You? But you’re… No, no. You don’t know what you want. You’re just a girl, Esme. In ten years, you’ll thank me.”

“But…”

“You are going to marry him, as your mother says, Esme,” Father commands, and then looks at my mother. She smiles encouragingly at him. Good dog. I picture her patting him on the head and offering him a biscuit. I have to stifle a giggle at the very accurate image.

“Yes. You don’t have a choice.” For once, my mother entirely drops her lady-like, kind demeanor. I can see all the unrestrained fire I inherited from her. It is very intimidating, and I realize she’s right. I am trapped. I can’t escape, and so I shall be shepherded into another prison.

I look down. “All right. I’ll marry him.”

Instantly, she is charming and kind once again. “Excellent. What a good choice. Shall we give him the good news?”

I stride out the door, trying not to think about what I’ve just agreed to… sort of.

You’ve fallen forever…