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Imprint

Summary:
It is not in the nature of every wolf to imprint. But for those destined to that fate, it is inevitable. After all, it is just that; fate.

[Jacob/Renesmee]


Notes:
:D jasper said is at it again! xD I haven't forgotten Heat, but I just couldn't ignore this idea either. Please enjoy this little twisted gem... it's worth it.


5. Best Friends

Rating 0/5   Word Count 1127   Review this Chapter

Issy’s POV

“Are you sure this is okay?” Sawyer asked, looking a little nervous behind the wheel of my brother’s car.

“Positive,” I replied. “Now let’s get going, Ness is waiting on us.” Sawyer still looked nervous. Maybe it was because he had the fear of God instilled in him about the law from an early-aged run in with Chief Swan and I was asking him to drive us to Ness’s an entire two months before his sixteenth birthday in what was technically a stolen car because we hadn’t asked Ephraim if it was okay. That could be it.

Sensing he wasn’t going to win, Sawyer cranked the car and we got going. He drove extra careful the whole way into Forks. I shook my head. He was just being silly. But it wasn’t Sawyer if he wasn’t silly, so I guess I should be thankful he wasn’t doing anything completely out of the ordinary like he usually does when we all get together. It’s not a secret that Sawyer was my first non-family friend in La Push, and consequently, my best friend for always and eternity. Ness Cullen was first friend at my new school in Forks, though. She was the new girl just as much as I was, and consequently, we stuck together like glue. In the past month that I’d been living in La Push, the three of us had all become friends, the best of, if you would. And just like who my two best friends are isn’t a secret, it’s not a secret that the two of them are absolutely perfect for each other, and I think they know it, too.

Sawyer was still driving like a granny when we pulled down Ness’s long winding drive. “Don’t worry,” I said playfully, “Ness isn’t getting any older or anything.” I didn’t know at the time I would eat the irony of my words.

“No one asked you, goof,” Sawyer said, quoting me and making me snort my soda painfully as I took a drink.

“Oh, Saw,” I exclaimed, “you do kill me.”

Sawyer laughed and honked the horn twice. I scooted into the middle seat of the truck’s cab as Ness flew out of the front door on winged feet. She wrenched open the door and plopped beside me, giving me one of her hugs, a violent, heated squeeze that came along with a squeal.

“You got here just in time!!” she said happily, and then looked over me to Sawyer. “Drive, Saw. Drive like your life depends on it.”

“Yes, ma’am,” Sawyer said amused, backing around and setting off down the driveway. This was confident Sawyer, the one that I met that first time at the beach and the one that always showed up when Ness was present.

I laughed at Ness’s exuberance. “Good gosh, Ness. What was so important?”

She leaned back in her seat. “I dunno. I just don’t want to be at home tonight, you know?”

“Yeah,” I agreed, nodding. “Too bad some of us have to be home for you not to be.”

Ness laughed and Sawyer snorted loudly. “By some of us, you mean you,” Sawyer taunted, earning a light punch from me and my guns. Stupid boy.

We parked Ephraim’s car in its usual spot beside the storage shed. Noisily, we made the mass exodus out of the truck, Sawyer falling out the door when I pushed him then wrenching me out by the arms in retaliation. Ness, not to be outdone, sprang out the door as well, outlandishly tackling both Sawyer and myself. I stumbled back painfully on my bum.

My hands felt like they were on fire. “Oh shizz!” I screeched, pulling my hands away from the gritty ground where they had been brutally damaged and were bleeding.

Ness pinched her nose. “Yuck. I hate blood.”

“Yeah, well smell it, jerk, ‘cause it’s all your fault,” I teased, flaunting my red stained hands at her. Ness sprang lithely away from me, pinching her nose all the tighter.

“Pats wastty,” Ness complained. I laughed at her. She sounded ridiculous.

Sawyer jumped to her rescue. “Leave her alone, Issy. It’s not even that funny.”

I scowled at his back and Ness snorted as we went inside. My house was silent, a deafening sort of silence. And in my house, quiet was absolutely chilling. It meant either everyone was out, which never happened as often as I’d like, or it meant that everyone was perched around the corner waiting to scare the living daylights out of you. Another less popular option was that my family had all been murdered, but a better alternative was that everyone was eating. That’s what it takes to make my brothers quiet; death or food. So that being said, the first place I looked was the kitchen.

“Mom? Dad? ‘Nasseh?” I peeked my head in the kitchen, finding it empty.

Sawyer followed me in closely. “Ephraim?” I looked at him like he was crazy. He shrugged. “You forgot him.”

“Whatever, Saw.” I shook my head, flicking on the light as Ness joined us.

“Hey, Issy? I think I know where they went,” said Ness, waving a page of notebook paper at me. I took it from her and scanned it before reading aloud.

“Went to the store for Ephraim. He’s sick in his room. Don’t wake him up. Your dad and Manasseh went to the cliffs. Back later, mom,” I read in a nasally imitation of my mother’s voice. I flicked the note onto the counter.

“Great,” I complained. “I’ll have to sit through mom’s royal nursemaid act for weeks now.”

Ness laughed. “Shouldn’t Ephraim be complaining, not you?”

I cracked a smile. “Probably. Sure. Yes.”

Sawyer opened his mouth to say something, looking distinctly Cheshire cat like with a mischievous glint in his eye. I was already planning my retort when we were all rudely interrupted.

“Dad, c’mon. I didn’t mean anything by it,” ‘Nasseh said, clearly flustered up about something. “I… well it was pretty weird, I mean, c’mon!”

“Shut up, Manasseh,” I heard my dad say from the other room. I flinched. I’d only heard my dad tell us to shut up a total of three times in all my years, and it never got any better or easier to hear him say it.

“Here come the fireworks,” I muttered, blowing a stray hair away from my face.

My dad stormed in the kitchen looking angry, a large scar slashed over his stomach that I didn’t remember ever being there before. I looked at him, confused, silently asking my question. He wasn’t looking at me, though. Dad was looking straight past me, a flabbergasted look over his face. I turned around and followed his gaze, but it was only Sawyer and Ness.

“Oh, dad,” I said, remember the manners my mom had pounded into my head. “This is one of my friends from school, Ness Cullen. Ness, this is my dad, Jacob Black.”