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Transformation & Infatuation

Summary:
When Edward meets a mysterious young girl and is faced with the decision of saving her or letting her die, he unknowingly turns her. As a newly turned vampire, Bella is confused and alone, and is searching for the mysterious angel that saved her.


Notes:
This story was originally published on fanfiction.net, and is by the same author.


5. Getting Home

Rating 0/5   Word Count 772   Review this Chapter

Bella's POV

I knew I had to leave the morgue quickly. The clock said the time was 12:45—lunch time. If I hurried, I could get out of there before the search for the missing corpse started.

A fire evacuation plan was taped to the door. I quickly glanced at it to find the most discreet way out of here. A fire escape. All I had to do was climb up four flights of stairs. Not too physically taxing, but with my track record for falling on stairs….

Looking out the window in the door, I didn’t see anyone. I pictured the fire escape map in my head…and found that I could see a crystal-clear image of it in my head. Whoa. Photographic memory!

As I walked out of the doorway, I tripped on the doorjamb. I guess death didn’t make me any more graceful. While sprawled out on my stomach, I smelled the most delicious scent. To accompany the smell, I heard a beautiful pulsing beat.

I somehow rose fluidly to my feet. An older man in a lab coat stood in front of me.

“Miss? Are you alright?” he asked me. I couldn’t reply. I was mesmerized by how his blood vessels were throbbing in time to the beautiful pulsing in my head. I licked my lips hungrily. I felt a feeling like an adrenaline rush, and my muscles readied to spring forward.

I tried to shake all of these confusing emotions and inclinations off. As I met his gaze for the first time, his expression changed from worry to fear.

“The st-t-t-airs are to y-your right. The m-main exit is u-up one f-f-floor,” he stuttered, then turned and rushed off in the other direction. Seeing him run off, I was tempted to run him down and sink my--. What? What was I thinking? None of my thoughts or actions made sense anymore.

I turned to my right and pulled open the door to the stairwell. I ran up the stairs, and I was amazingly fast. I could also stumble amazingly fast.

I decided to go up to the roof and try to climb down the fire escape because the fewer people that saw me, the better. I reached the top landing and wrenched open the door, only to have the whole door be pulled off its hinges. I was holding the entire door, in one hand. With. No. Effort. All of this was just too freaky.

I gently set the door down and walked out onto the roof. Scanning the rooftop, I found the fire escape on the opposite side. I crossed the roof in less than a second, and lowered my feet to the top rung of the rusty ladder. I made it down five rungs before the ladder began to tremble. I tightened my left hand’s grip on the ladder, only to have a piece of it break off and crumble in my hand. I gulped. This situation was going downhill fast.

I warily took another step down, but my foot broke through the rung. This threw me off balance, and I fell three-and-a-half stories off the side of the ladder. Falling through the air, I remembered all of my happy memories. Living with Renée. Vacations in California with Charlie. My few friends in Phoenix.

Then, just before I hit the ground, I remembered Carrie dying and then a beautiful boy--. The memory broke off as I hit the ground with a loud thud. I waited for the pain that was sure to come. But all I felt was the cool grass beneath my back. I had felt myself hit the ground, but there was no pain.

I gently sat up, checking myself for injuries. I stretched my arms, waiting for the stabbing shoot of pain that accompanies a freshly-broken bone. Nope, no pain. I then reached back to check the back of my head. My hand felt wet. In fact, my whole body felt wet. I brought my hand to my face, but it was not covered in blood. Only then did I realize that it was drizzling.

The sky was overcast, but I could see it clearing up along the western horizon. Ah, good. Sunny weather. I sighed, missing my mother and sunny Phoenix. The sooner I could get on a plane—I shuddered—or a boat, the sooner I could get home.

But this posed a problem: I didn’t have any money. This definitely narrowed my options. I sighed in frustration. I picked myself up and began walking away from the hospital, towards the smell of the sea. I was crying in frustration, except I physically couldn’t cry.

I cried dry tears as I walked away, trying to find a way back home.